Meenaksi Pañcaratnam

Meenaksi Pañcaratnam

Goddess Meenakshi is the consort of Lord Siva. According to legend, Vidyavati was an ardent devotee of Devi Parvati. Moved by her devotion, Goddess Parvati appeared before her in the form of a young girl and told her to ask for a boon. Vidyavati asked the boon that the Goddess be born as her daughter in the same form as she has appeared before her. Goddess Parvati told her that in her next birth when she (Vidyavati) will be the wife of Malayathuvasa Pandyan, She will be born as her daughter. This daughter was Meenaksi and she won Lord Siva's heart again.

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Mahesvara-sutrani

The Mahesvara-sutrani,  also known as the Siva-sutra-s, are fourteen verses that summarise the phonemes of Sanskrit language. It has been refered to in the Astadhyayi of Panini, and is generally regarded as the text responsible for Sanskrit syllables. 

Within the tradition they are known as the Akṣarasamāmnāya, "recitation of phonemes," but they are popularly known as the Siva Sutras because they are said to have been revealed to Pāṇini by Lord Siva himself.

Legend has it that at the end of the great cosmic dance, Lord Siva was requested by the assembled siddha-s to reveal a divine language. In response the Lord of Dance, beat his hand drum fourteen times. The sounds that came out of this is considered the Mahesvara-sutrani. 


Narayanastakam by Kuranarayana Svami

Narayanastakam by Kuranarayana Svami

Narayanastakam is a beautiful poem of eight verses, composed by the great acarya Kuranarayana Svami, who lived in the 14th-15th century AD. He is known to be a great devotee of Lord Narayana and all of his auspicious attributes. He has been an important acarya to propogate the teachings of Visista-Advaita, and especially the path of Prapatti or divine surrender. 

This melodious chant, honors lord Narayana and glorifies all of his positive and auspicious attributes. It also affirms that the path to realize the highest truth is surrendering to the divine reality, and reiterates this strongly. 

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Hayagriva Kavacam

Hayagriva Kavacam

In the Vedic culture, Healing and Caring are considered to be part of a spiritual process. The energy of healing and caring is considered pure and divine. The Kavacam (literally meaning an ‘armor) is a spiritual armour that brings the divine source of pure energy closer to the heart. Thus ensuring that the healing process is safe, pure and sacred. 

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Gayatri Avahana Mantra

Gayatri Avahana Mantra

Gayatri, is the form of the rising sun that is honoured through the most renowned Gayatri mantra. The mantra is traditionally used in a procedure called Sandhyavandanam, through which the sun is honoured at different times of the day. A key aspect of this procedure is the Gayatri mantra japa, where the timeless Gayatri mantra is recited a number of times, in order to honour the sun.

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Sri Suktam

Sri Suktam

Sri Suktam is a devotional hymn honoring Sri as Lakshmi, the Vedic goddess of wealth, prosperity and fertility. The goddess Sri appears in several earlier vedic hymns, and is the personification of auspicious and royal qualities. 

Sri Suktam is perhaps the first text in which the homology between Sri and Lakshmi is drawn, and the goddesses are further associated with the god of fire, Agni. Since the later epic period (ca 400 CE), Sri Lakshmi is particularly associated with Visnu as his wife or consort.

 

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Narayana Suktam

Narayana Suktam

The Narayana Suktam is, often thought of as the mystical appendix to the Purusa Suktam. While the Purusa Suktam presents the Supreme Being as an All-encompassing, Impersonal Purusa, the Narayana Suktam honours Narayana, a very personal and accessible Lord. The Narayana Suktam is a devout, touching, emotional and personal address to the Creator and sustainer of the universe. The chant also presents that the divine is residing deep in our hearts, and all we need to do is acknowledge his presence and connect with our hearts to access his grace. 

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Sudarsana Kavacam

Sudarsana Kavacam

In the Vedic culture, Healing and Caring are considered to be part of a spiritual process. The energy of healing and caring is considered pure and divine. The Kavacam (literally meaning an ‘armor) is a spiritual armour that brings the divine source of pure energy closer to the heart. Thus ensuring that the healing process is safe, pure and sacred. 

Here is the chant titled Sudarsana Kavacam, that honors the deity Lord Sudarsana, who is the sacred disc of Lord Vishnu. It is believed that listening to this chant removes all obstacles that may come our way and elevate our consciousness. 

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Sraddha Suktam

Sraddha Suktam

Sraddha, meaning intense faith or conviction, is the cornerstone for success in any endeavour, be it in our spiritual or personal path.  It enables us to perserve in the face of even the greatest difficulties. The Sraddha suktam, which is part of the Taittiriya Brahmana, underlines the significance of Sraddha and honours it as a goddess. 

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